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Girls free 2 way cams

Girls free 2 way cams-79

The Cottingley Fairies appear in a series of five photographs taken by Elsie Wright (1901–88) and Frances Griffiths (1907–86), two young cousins who lived in Cottingley, near Bradford in England.In 1917, when the first two photographs were taken, Elsie was 16 years old and Frances was 9.

Doyle contacted Gardner in June 1920 to determine the background to the photographs, and wrote to Elsie and her father to request permission from the latter to use the prints in his article.He suggested that a troupe of dancers had masqueraded as fairies, and expressed doubt as to their "distinctly 'Parisienne but Elsie's father told Gardner that he had been so certain the photographs were fakes that while the girls were away he searched their bedroom and the area around the beck (stream), looking for scraps of pictures or cutouts, but found nothing "incriminating".Gardner believed the Wright family to be honest and respectable.Public reaction was mixed; some accepted the images as genuine, but others believed they had been faked.Interest in the Cottingley Fairies gradually declined after 1921.The picture on the photographic plate he developed showed Frances behind a bush in the foreground, on which four fairies appeared to be dancing.

Knowing his daughter's artistic ability, and that she had spent some time working in a photographer's studio, he dismissed the figures as cardboard cutouts.

Arthur Wright was "obviously impressed" that Doyle was involved, and gave his permission for publication, but he refused payment on the grounds that, if genuine, the images should not be "soiled" by money.

Gardner and Doyle sought a second expert opinion from the photographic company Kodak.

Both girls married and lived abroad for a time after they grew up, yet the photographs continued to hold the public imagination.

In 1966 a reporter from the Daily Express newspaper traced Elsie, who had by then returned to the UK.

The photographs and two of the cameras used are on display in the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford, England.