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Fender super reverb dating

fender super reverb dating-83

So, here I am, writing about the history of some old gear, the Silverface Fender.I also have a small amount of knowledge of and experience in working on tube amps.

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I'm also not going to get too deeply into technical details of circuitry.That Music Master Bass amp or Silverface Champ that you could have bought all day for 50 bucks as recently as 2 years ago can run as high as 350-400 on ebay now.Though, hopefully no one will bid on those that are that high. But, they are still available at killer prices, if for no other reason, there are many of them still available..a silverfaced amp was passed over in the 80's and 90's by someone that HAD to have a tweed or blackfaced one.If you need to see them, Google the Fender Field Guide. Quite simply, a Silverface Fender Amp is an amplifier made by the Fender Musical Instruments Company from late 1967 to 1983. I suppose that if you compare Silverface equipment to its earlier tweed and blackface brethren, the silverface amps are in many cases not that great, and that is the justification that has been used for a couple of decades by Silverface critics.They are called "silverface" due to the brushed aluminum look of the faceplate. Do a quick look on ebay, eliminate the ridiculously high opening bids that no one else has bid on, (which in case of the search I just did is well over half of them) and you'll find that in most cases you can expect to pay about twice as much for a Blackface than a Silverface, and at least three or four times as much for a tweed.I also apologize for not having a lot of photos of mint Silverface equipment.

Presently, I personally own only two well worn Silverface road warriors, a 1971 Champ, and a 1972 Bassman 50 (AA371).

by Frank Stroupe ***WARNING-There are voltages inside of a tube guitar amp that can KILL you.

There are components in the amp that hold live current long after the amplifier is unplugged.

In late 1967, Fender changed the cosmetics of the faceplate to a brushed aluminum look with blue and black lettering, and the grillcloth was given a blue "sparkle".

There were a very few cosmetic changes made between 19.

Don Randall obviously didn't agree with what was going on, as he resigned his general manager position in mid-1969.