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Just northwest of Bardstown in Clermont, the Jim Beam American Stillhouse, home of the world’s top-selling bourbon, offers the chance to interact with Fred Noe, master distiller and seventh-generation member of the Beam family, and enjoy a bourbon-themed meal.About 90 minutes into the drive from Bardstown to Owensboro is Bowling Green, a can’t-miss stop on the spirits trail.

Fly in to Louisville International Airport to explore the welcoming and friendly home of the Kentucky Derby and Muhammad Ali.Now, the city’s known for a thriving farm-to-table dining scene and numerous bourbon-focused bars.Start at the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience, Kentucky’s first commercial distillery, at the row’s historic end around West Main and South Sixth streets.The town’s annual Kentucky Bourbon Festival in September is a nice time to soak it all in; events range from coopers’ barrel-making demonstrations to historical tours and cocktail challenges.Heaven Hill Distilleries’ Bourbon Heritage Center varies its tours from a history-infused trolley ride to an extensive look behind the scenes.There’s a spirit that flows from Kentucky into Tennessee. distilling dynasties are resurging, complemented by a prolific craft movement.

Until the early 20th century, abundant corn and pristine water fueled family-owned distilleries, but temperance and Prohibition forced operations out of business. Explore the spirits of both past and present in these six towns.

The Moonshine Company, housed in a century-old building in downtown Paducah, uses a fine-tuned family recipe passed down from generation to generation.

Learn about the history of Kentucky moonshine through antiques on display as you sample the Loaded Lemonade, Cousin Billy’s or Uncle Mosey’s Moonshine.

Between Owensboro and Nashville, visit the historic city of Paducah.

A UNESCO Creative City, Paducah is also crafting traditional Kentucky moonshine.

Select from 200-plus bourbons in the basement bar of the The Miller House, a 1905 restaurant.